Ce este ICD_The International Classification of Diseases

_Ce este ICD_ [ OMS – WHO – ONU ]

 _The International Classification of Diseases_

 Clasificarea statistica internaționala a bolilor și a problemelor de sanatate inrudite

 

Clasificarea statistica internationala a bolilor si a problemelor de sanatate inrudite (mai cunoscuta prin abrevierea ICD) atribuie coduri pentru clasificarea bolilor si a unei mari varietati de semne, simptome, acuze, circumstante sociale, si cauze externe de leziune sau boala. Prin acest sistem, fiecare problema de sanatate poate fi pusa intr-o categorie unica si i se atribuie un cod de maximum sase caractere. Categoriile cuprind grupuri de boli asemanatoare.

 

Clasificarea internationala a bolilor este publicata de Organizatia Mondiala a Sanatatii (OMS) si este folosita in toata lumea pentru statistica medicala (mortalitate, morbiditate, etc.), de sistemele de asigurari de sanatate si in aparatele electronice de automatizare a deciziilor in medicina. Acest sistem este proiectat sa promoveze comparabilitatea internationala in colectarea, procesarea, clasificarea si prezentarea acestor statistici.

ICD este o clasificare de baza

a Familiei de clasificari internaționale

a OMS (WHO-FIC).

 

The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, usually called by the short-form name International Classification of Diseases (ICD), is the international “standard diagnostic tool for epidemiology, health management and clinical purposes”. The ICD is maintained by the World Health Organization (WHO), the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations System.  The ICD is designed as a health care classification system, providing a system of diagnostic codes for classifying diseases, including nuanced classifications of a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances, and external causes of injury or disease. This system is designed to map health conditions to corresponding generic categories together with specific variations, assigning for these a designated code, up to six characters long. Thus, major categories are designed to include a set of similar diseases.

 

The ICD is published by the WHO and used worldwide for morbidity and mortality statistics, reimbursement systems, and automated decision support in health care. This system is designed to promote international comparability in the collection, processing, classification, and presentation of these statistics. As in the case of the analogous (but limited to mental and behavioral disorders) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM, currently in version 5), the ICD is a major project to statistically classify health disorders, and provide diagnostic assistance. The ICD is a core statistically-based classificatory diagnostic system for health care related issues of the WHO Family of International Classifications (WHO-FIC).

 

The ICD is revised periodically and is currently in its tenth revision. The ICD-10, as it is therefore known, was developed in 1992 to track health statistics. ICD-11 is planned for 2017.  As of 2007, development plans included using Web 2.0 principles to support detailed revision. Annual minor updates and triennial major updates are published by the WHO. The ICD is part of a “family” of guides that can be used to complement each other, including also the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health which focuses on the domains of functioning (disability) associated with health conditions, from both medical and social perspectives.

 

 

ICD Historical synopsis

 

In 1860, during the international statistical congress held in London, Florence Nightingale made a proposal that was to result in the development of the first model of systemic collection of hospital data. In 1893, a French physician, Jacques Bertillon, introduced the Bertillon Classification of Causes of Death at a congress of the International Statistical Institute in Chicago. A number of countries and cities adopted Bertillon’s system, which was based on the principle of distinguishing between general diseases and those localized to a particular organ or anatomical site, as used by the City of Paris for classifying deaths. Subsequent revisions represented a synthesis of English, German, and Swiss classifications, expanding from the original 44 titles to 161 titles. In 1898, the American Public Health Association (APHA) recommended that the registrars of Canada, Mexico, and the United States also adopt it. The APHA also recommended revising the system every ten years to ensure the system remained current with medical practice advances. As a result, the first international conference to revise the International Classification of Causes of Death took place in 1900, with revisions occurring every ten years thereafter. At that time, the classification system was contained in one book, which included an Alphabetic Index as well as a Tabular List. The book was small compared with current coding texts.

 

The revisions that followed contained minor changes, until the sixth revision of the classification system. With the sixth revision, the classification system expanded to two volumes. The sixth revision included morbidity and mortality conditions, and its title was modified to reflect the changes: International Statistical Classification of Diseases, Injuries and Causes of Death (ICD). Prior to the sixth revision, responsibility for ICD revisions fell to the Mixed Commission, a group composed of representatives from the International Statistical Institute and the Health Organization of the League of Nations. In 1948, the WHO assumed responsibility for preparing and publishing the revisions to the ICD every ten years. WHO sponsored the seventh and eighth revisions in 1957 and 1968, respectively. It later become clear that the established ten year interval between revisions was too short.

 

The ICD is currently the most widely used statistical classification system for diseases in the world. International health statistics using this system are available at the Global Health Observatory (GHO).

 

In addition, some countries—including Australia, Canada, and the United States—have developed their own adaptations of ICD, with more procedure codes for classification of operative or diagnostic procedures.

 

 

Versions of ICD

 

ICD-6

 

The ICD-6, published in 1949, was the first to be shaped to become suitable for morbidity reporting. Accordingly, the name changed from International List of Causes of Death to International Statistical Classification of Diseases. The combined code section for injuries and their associated accidents was split into two, a chapter for injuries, and a chapter for their external causes. With use for morbidity there was a need for coding mental conditions, and for the first time a section on mental disorders was added.

 

ICD-7

 

The International Conference for the Seventh Revision of the International Classification of Diseases was held in Paris under the auspices of WHO in February 1955. In accordance with a recommendation of the WHO Expert Committee on Health Statistics, this revision was limited to essential changes and amendments of errors and inconsistencies.

 

ICD-8a

 

The Eighth Revision Conference convened by WHO met in Geneva, from 6 to 12 July 1965. This revision was more radical than the Seventh but left unchanged the basic structure of the Classification and the general philosophy of classifying diseases, whenever possible, according to their etiology rather than a particular manifestation. During the years that the Seventh and Eighth Revisions of the ICD were in force, the use of the ICD for indexing hospital medical records increased rapidly and some countries prepared national adaptations which provided the additional detail needed for this application of the ICD. In the USA, a group of consultants was asked to study the 8th revision of ICD (ICD-8a) for its applicability to various users in the United States. This group recommended that further detail be provided for coding hospital and morbidity data. The American Hospital Association’s “Advisory Committee to the Central Office on ICDA” developed the needed adaptation proposals, resulting in the publication of the International Classification of Diseases, Adapted (ICDA). In 1968, the United States Public Health Service published the International Classification of Diseases, Adapted, 8th Revision for use in the United States (ICDA-8a). Beginning in 1968, ICDA-8a served as the basis for coding diagnostic data for both official morbidity [and mortality] statistics in the United States.

 

ICD-9

 

The International Conference for the Ninth Revision of the International Classification of Diseases, convened by WHO, met in Geneva from 30 September to 6 October 1975. In the discussions leading up to the conference, it had originally been intended that there should be little change other than updating of the classification. This was mainly because of the expense of adapting data processing systems each time the classification was revised.

 

There had been an enormous growth of interest in the ICD and ways had to be found of responding to this, partly by modifying the classification itself and partly by introducing special coding provisions. A number of representations were made by specialist bodies which had become interested in using the ICD for their own statistics. Some subject areas in the classification were regarded as inappropriately arranged and there was considerable pressure for more detail and for adaptation of the classification to make it more relevant for the evaluation of medical care, by classifying conditions to the chapters concerned with the part of the body affected rather than to those dealing with the underlying generalized disease.

 

At the other end of the scale, there were representations from countries and areas where a detailed and sophisticated classification was irrelevant, but which nevertheless needed a classification based on the ICD in order to assess their progress in health care and in the control of disease. A field test with a bi-axial classification approach—one axis for anatomy, another for etiology—showed the impracticability of such approach for routine use.

 

The final proposals presented to and accepted by the Conference in 1978 retained the basic structure of the ICD, although with much additional detail at the level of the four digit subcategories, and some optional five digit subdivisions. For the benefit of users not requiring such detail, care was taken to ensure that the categories at the three digit level were appropriate.

 

For the benefit of users wishing to produce statistics and indexes oriented towards medical care, the Ninth Revision included an optional alternative method of classifying diagnostic statements, including information about both an underlying general disease and a manifestation in a particular organ or site. This system became known as the dagger and asterisk system and is retained in the Tenth Revision. A number of other technical innovations were included in the Ninth Revision, aimed at increasing its flexibility for use in a variety of situations. It was eventually replaced by ICD-10, the version currently in use by the WHO and most countries. Given the widespread expansion in the tenth revision, it is not possible to convert ICD-9 data sets directly into ICD-10 data sets, although some tools are available to help guide users. Publication of ICD-9 without IP restrictions in a world with evolving electronic data systems led to a range of products based on ICD-9, such as MeDRA or the Read directory.

 

ICPM

 

When ICD-9 was published by the World Health Organization (WHO), the International Classification of Procedures in Medicine (ICPM) was also developed (1975) and published (1978). The ICPM surgical procedures fascicle was originally created by the United States, based on its adaptations of ICD (called ICDA), which had contained a procedure classification since 1962. ICPM is published separately from the ICD disease classification as a series of supplementary documents called fascicles (bundles or groups of items). Each fascicle contains a classification of modes of laboratory, radiology, surgery, therapy, and other diagnostic procedures. Many countries have adapted and translated the ICPM in parts or as a whole and are using it with amendments since then.

 

ICD-9-CM

 

International Classification of Diseases, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM)

is an adaption created by the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) and used in assigning diagnostic and procedure codes associated with inpatient, outpatient, and physician office utilization in the United States. The ICD-9-CM is based on the ICD-9 but provides for additional morbidity detail. It is updated annually on October 1.

 

It consists of two or three volumes:

 

Volumes 1 and 2 contain diagnosis codes.

(Volume 1 is a tabular listing, and volume 2 is an index.)

Extended for ICD-9-CM

 

Volume 3 contains procedure codes. ICD-9-CM only

 

The NCHS and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services are the U.S. governmental agencies responsible for overseeing all changes and modifications to the ICD-9-CM.

 

ICD-10

 

Work on ICD-10 began in 1983, and the new revision was endorsed by the Forty-third World Health Assembly in May 1990. The latest version came into use in WHO Member States starting in 1994. The classification system allows more than 155,000 different codes and permits tracking of many new diagnoses and procedures, a significant expansion on the 17,000 codes available in ICD-9. Adoption was relatively swift in most of the world. Several materials are made available online by WHO to facilitate its use, including a manual, training guidelines, a browser, and files for download. Some countries have adapted the international standard, such as the “ICD-10-AM” published in Australia in 1998 (also used in New Zealand), and the “ICD-10-CA” introduced in Canada in 2000.

 

ICD-10-CM

 

Adoption of ICD-10-CM has been slow in the United States. Since 1979, the USA had required ICD-9-CM codes for Medicare and Medicaid claims, and most of the rest of the American medical industry followed suit. On 1 January 1999 the ICD-10 (without clinical extensions) was adopted for reporting mortality, but ICD-9-CM was still used for morbidity. Meanwhile, NCHS received permission from the WHO to create a clinical modification of the ICD-10, and has production of all these systems:

 

ICD-10-CM, for diagnosis codes, is intended to replace volumes 1 and 2. Annual updates are provided.

 

ICD-10-PCS, for procedure codes, is intended to replace volume 3. Annual updates are provided.

 

On August 21, 2008, the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) proposed new code sets to be used for reporting diagnoses and procedures on health care transactions. Under the proposal, the ICD-9-CM code sets would be replaced with the ICD-10-CM code sets, effective October 1, 2013. On April 17, 2012 the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) published a proposed rule that would delay, from October 1, 2013 to October 1, 2014,the compliance date for the ICD-10-CM and PCS. Once again, Congress delayed implementation date to October 1, 2015, after it was inserted into “Doc Fix” Bill without debate over objections of many.

 

-Revisions to ICD-10-CM Include:

-Relevant information for ambulatory and managed care encounter.

-Expanded injury codes.

-New combination codes for diagnosis/symptoms to reduce the number of codes needed to describe a problem fully.

-Addition of sixth and seventh digit classification.

-Classification specific to laterality.

-Classification refinement for increased data granularity.

 

ICD-10-CA

 

ICD-10-CA is a clinical modification of ICD-10 developed by the Canadian Institute for Health Information for morbidity classification in Canada. ICD-10-CA applies beyond acute hospital care, and includes conditions and situations that are not diseases but represent risk factors to health, such as occupational and environmental factors, lifestyle and psycho-social circumstances.

 

ICD-11

 

The World Health Organization is currently revising the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) towards the ICD-11. The development is taking place on an internet-based workspace, called iCAT (Collaborative Authoring Tool) Platform, somewhat similar to a wiki – yet it requires more structure and peer review process. The WHO collaborates through this platform with all interested parties.

 

The final draft of the ICD-11 system is expected to be submitted to WHO’s World Health Assembly (WHA) for official endorsement by 2017. The beta draft was made available online in May 2012 for initial consultation and commenting.

 

In ICD-11 each disease entity will have definitions that give key descriptions and guidance on what the meaning of the entity/category is in human readable terms – to guide users. This is an advancement over ICD-10, which had only title headings. The Definitions have a standard structure according to a template with standard definition templates and further features exemplified in a “Content Model”. The Content Model is a structured framework that captures the knowledge that underpins the definition of an ICD entity. The Content Model therefore allows computerization (with links to ontologies and SNOMED CT). Each ICD entity can be seen from different dimensions or “parameters”.

 

For example, there are currently 13 defined main parameters in the Content Model (see below) to describe a category in ICD.

 

1- ICD Entity Title – Fully Specified Name

2- Classification Properties – disease, disorder, injury, etc.

3- Textual Definitions – short standard description

4- Terms – synonyms, other inclusion and exclusions

5- Body System/Structure Description – anatomy and physiology

6- Temporal Properties – acute, chronic or other

7- Severity of Subtypes Properties – mild, moderate, severe, or other scales

8- Manifestation Properties – signs, symptoms

9- Causal Properties – etiology: infectious, external cause, etc.

10- Functioning Properties – impact on daily life: activities and participation

11- Specific Condition Properties – relates to pregnancy etc.

12- Treatment Properties – specific treatment considerations: e.g. resistance

13- Diagnostic Criteria – operational definitions for assessment

 

ICD exists in 41 Languages in electronic versions and its expression in multiple languages will be systematically pursued in ICD11.

 

 

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ICD-10

 

          ICD-10 is the 10th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD), a medical classification list by the World Health Organization (WHO). It contains codes for diseases, signs and symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances, and external causes of injury or diseases.

 

ICD-10 will be implemented on October 1st, 2015, requiring all in the healthcare industry to comply with the new code set. These codes are utilized to code all diagnosis and hospital inpatient procedures for administrative transactions. The revisions reflect changes in the medical field.

 

The code set allows more than 14,400 different codes and permits the tracking of many new diagnoses. The codes can be expanded to over 16,000 codes by using optional sub-classifications. The detail reported by ICD can be further increased, with a simplified multi-axial approach, by using codes meant to be reported in a separate data field.

The WHO provides detailed information about ICD online, and makes available a set of materials online, such as an ICD-10 online browser, ICD-10 Training, ICD-10 online training, ICD-10 online training support, and study guide materials for download.

 

The International version of ICD should not be confused with national Clinical Modifications (CM) of ICD that frequently include much more detail, and sometimes have separate sections for procedures. The US ICD-10 Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM), for instance, has some 68,000 codes. The US also has the ICD-10 Procedure Coding System (ICD-10 PCS), a coding system that contains 76,000 codes not used by other countries.

 

Work on ICD-10 began in 1983 and was completed in 1992.

 

I _ A00–B99 _ Certain infectious and parasitic diseases

 

II _ C00–D48 _ Neoplasms

 

III_ D50–D89 _ Diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs and certain disorders involving the immune mechanism

 

IV _ E00–E90 _ Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases

 

V _ F00–F99 _ Mental and behavioural disorders

 

VI _ G00–G99 _ Diseases of the nervous system

 

VII _ H00–H59 _ Diseases of the eye and adnexa

 

VIII _ H60–H95 _ Diseases of the ear and mastoid process

 

IX _ I00–I99 _ Diseases of the circulatory system

 

X _ J00–J99 _ Diseases of the respiratory system

 

XI _ K00–K93 _ Diseases of the digestive system

 

XII _ L00–L99 _ Diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue

 

XIII _ M00–M99 _ Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue

 

XIV _ N00–N99 _ Diseases of the genitourinary system

 

XV _ O00–O99 _ Pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium

 

XVI _ P00–P96 _ Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period

 

XVII _ Q00–Q99 _ Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities

 

XVIII _ R00–R99 _ Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified

 

XIX _ S00–T98 _ Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes

 

XX _ V01–Y98 _ External causes of morbidity and mortality

 

XXI _ Z00–Z99 _ Factors influencing health status and contact with health services

 

XXII _ U00–U99 _ Codes for special purposes

 

National adoption for clinical use

 

Some 25 countries use ICD-10 for reimbursement and resource allocation in their health system. A few of them have made modifications to ICD to better accommodate this use of ICD-10. The article below makes reference to some of these modifications. The unchanged international version of ICD-10 is used in about 110 countries for performing cause of death reporting and statistics.

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ICD-10 Chapter V: Mental and behavioural disorders

 

The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD-10) is a coding of diseases and signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or diseases, as classified by the World Health Organization (WHO).

 

ICD-10 Chapter V:

Mental and behavioural disorders.

 

ICD-10 Chapter V: Mental and behavioral disorders

 

The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD-10) is a coding of diseases and signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or diseases, as classified by the World Health Organization (WHO).

 

Contents

1 F00–F99 – Mental and behavioral disorders

 

1.1 (F00–F09) Organic, including symptomatic, mental disorders

1.2 (F10–F19) Mental and behavioral disorders due to psychoactive substance use

1.3 (F20–F29) Schizophrenia, schyzotypal and delusional disorders

1.4 (F30–F39) Mood (affective) disorders

1.5 (F40–F48) Neurotic, stress-related and somatoform disorders

1.6 (F50–F59) Behavioral syndromes associated with physiological disturbances and physical factors

1.7 (F60–F69) Disorders of adult personality and behavior

1.8 (F70–F79) Mental retardation

1.9 (F80–F89) Disorders of psychological development

1.10 (F90–F98) Behavioral and emotional disorders with onset usually occurring in childhood and adolescence

1.11 (F99) Unspecified mental disorder

 

 

F00–F99 – Mental and behavioral disorders

 

(F00–F09)

Organic, including symptomatic, mental disorders

 

(F00) Dementia in Alzheimer’s disease

 

(F01) Vascular dementia

(F01.1) Multi-infarct dementia

 

(F02) Dementia in other diseases classified elsewhere

(F02.0) Dementia in Pick’s disease

(F02.1) Dementia in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

(F02.2) Dementia in Huntington’s disease

(F02.3) Dementia in Parkinson’s disease

(F02.4) Dementia in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease

 

(F03) Unspecified dementia

 

(F04) Organic amnesic syndrome, not induced by alcohol and other psychoactive substances

 

(F05) Delirium, not induced by alcohol and other psychoactive substances

 

(F06) Other mental disorders due to brain damage and dysfunction and to physical disease

(F06.0) Organic hallucinosis

(F06.1) Organic catatonic disorder

(F06.2) Organic delusional (schizophrenia-like) disorder

(F06.3) Organic mood (affective) disorders

(F06.4) Organic anxiety disorder

(F06.5) Organic dissociative disorder

(F06.6) Organic emotionally labile (asthenic) disorder

(F06.7) Mild cognitive disorder

(F06.8) Other specified mental disorders due to brain damage and dysfunction and to physical disease

(F06.9) Unspecified mental disorder due to brain damage and dysfunction and to physical disease

Organic brain syndrome NOS

 

(F07) Personality and behavioral disorders due to brain disease, damage and dysfunction

(F07.0) Organic personality disorder

(F07.1) Post encephalitic syndrome[disambiguation needed]

(F07.2) Postconcussional syndrome

(F07.8) Other organic personality and behavioral disorders due to brain disease, damage and dysfunction

(F07.9) Unspecified organic personality and behavioral disorder due to brain disease, damage and dysfunction

 

(F09) Unspecified organic or symptomatic mental disorder

 

(F10–F19)

Mental and behavioural disorders due to psychoactive substance use

 

* Note:

the following conditions are subtypes of each code from F10–19:

(F1x.0) acute intoxication

(F1x.1) harmful use

(F1x.2) dependence syndrome

(F1x.3) withdrawal state

(F1x.4) withdrawal state with delirium

(F1x.5) psychotic disorder

(F1x.6) amnesic syndrome

(F1x.7) Residual and late-onset psychotic disorder

(F1x.8) other mental and behavioral disorder

(F1x.9) unspecified mental and behavioral disorder

 

(F10) use of alcohol

Acute alcohol intoxication/Alcohol intoxication

Harmful use of alcohol

Alcohol dependence syndrome

Alcohol withdrawal syndrome

Delirium tremens

Alcoholic hallucinosis

Korsakoff’s syndrome

 

(F11) use of opioids

Opioid overdose

Opioid dependency

(F12) use of cannabinoids

Short-term effects of cannabis

Cannabis dependence

(F13) use of sedatives or hypnotics

Benzodiazepine overdose

Benzodiazepine drug misuse

Benzodiazepine dependence

Benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome

 

(F14) use of cocaine

Cocaine intoxication

Cocaine dependence

 

(F15) use of other stimulants, including caffeine

Stimulant psychosis

(F16) use of hallucinogens

Posthallucinogen perception disorder

(F17) use of tobacco

Nicotine withdrawal

(F18) use of volatile solvents

 

(F19) multiple drug use and use of other psychoactive substances

 

(F20–F29)

Schizophrenia, schizotypal and delusional disorders

 

(F20) Schizophrenia

(F20.0) Paranoid schizophrenia

(F20.1) Hebephrenic schizophrenia (Disorganized schizophrenia)

(F20.2) Catatonic schizophrenia

(F20.3) Undifferentiated schizophrenia

(F20.4) Post-schizophrenic depression

(F20.5) Residual schizophrenia

(F20.6) Simple schizophrenia

(F20.8) Other schizophrenia

Cenesthopathic schizophrenia

Schizophreniform disorder NOS

Schizophreniform psychosis NOS

(F20.9) Schizophrenia, unspecified

 

(F21) Schizotypal disorder

 

(F22) Persistent delusional disorders

(F22.0) Delusional disorder

(F22.8) Other persistent delusional disorders

Delusional dysmorphophobia

Involutional paranoid state

Paranoia querulans

(F22.9) Persistent delusional disorder, unspecified

 

(F23) Acute and transient psychotic disorders

(F23.0) Acute polymorphic psychotic disorder without symptoms of schizophrenia

(F23.1) Acute polymorphic psychotic disorder with symptoms of schizophrenia

(F23.2) Acute schizophrenia-like psychotic disorder

(F23.3) Other acute predominantly delusional psychotic disorders

(F23.8) Other acute and transient psychotic disorders

(F23.9) Acute and transient psychotic disorder, unspecified

 

(F24) Induced delusional disorder

Folie a deux

Induced paranoid disorder

Induced psychotic disorder

 

(F25) Schizoaffective disorders

(F25.0) Schizoaffective disorder, manic type

(F25.1) Schizoaffective disorder, depressive type

(F25.2) Schizoaffective disorder, mixed type

(F25.8) Other schizoaffective disorders

(F25.9) Schizoaffective disorder, unspecified

 

(F28) Other nonorganic psychotic disorders

Chronic hallucinatory psychosis

 

(F29) Unspecified nonorganic psychosis

 

(F30–F39)

Mood (affective) disorders

 

(F30) Manic episode

(F30.0) Hypomania

(F30.1) Mania without psychotic symptoms

(F30.2) Mania with psychotic symptoms

(F30.8) Other manic episodes

(F30.9) Manic episode, unspecified

 

(F31) Bipolar affective disorder

(F31.0) Bipolar affective disorder, current episode hypomaniac

(F31.1) Bipolar affective disorder, current episode manic without psychotic symptoms

(F31.2) Bipolar affective disorder, current episode manic with psychotic symptoms

(F31.3) Bipolar affective disorder, current episode mild or moderate depression

(F31.4) Bipolar affective disorder, current episode severe depression without psychotic symptoms

(F31.5) Bipolar affective disorder, current episode severe depression with psychotic symptoms

(F31.6) Bipolar affective disorder, current episode mixed

(F31.7) Bipolar affective disorder, currently in remission

(F31.8) Other bipolar affective disorders

Bipolar II disorder

Recurrent manic episodes NOS

(F31.9) Bipolar affective disorder, unspecified

 

(F32) Depressive episode

(F32.0) Mild depressive episode

(F32.1) Moderate depressive episode

(F32.2) Severe depressive episode without psychotic symptoms

(F32.3) Severe depressive episode with psychotic symptoms

(F32.8) Other depressive episodes

Atypical depression

Single episodes of “masked” depression NOS

(F32.9) Depressive episode, unspecified

 

(F33) Recurrent depressive disorder

(F33.0) Recurrent depressive disorder, current episode mild

(F33.1) Recurrent depressive disorder, current episode moderate

(F33.2) Recurrent depressive disorder, current episode severe without psychotic symptoms

(F33.3) Recurrent depressive disorder, current episode severe with psychotic symptoms

(F33.4) Recurrent depressive disorder, currently in remission

(F33.8) Other recurrent depressive disorders

(F33.9) Recurrent depressive disorder, unspecified

 

(F34) Persistent mood (affective) disorders

(F34.0) Cyclothymia

(F34.1) Dysthymia

(F34.8) Other persistent mood (affective) disorders

(F34.9) Persistent mood (affective) disorder, unspecified

 

(F38) Other mood (affective) disorders

(F38.0) Other single mood (affective) disorders

Mixed affective episode

(F38.1) Other recurrent mood (affective) disorders

Recurrent brief depressive episodes

(F38.8) Other specified mood (affective) disorders

 

(F39) Unspecified mood (affective) disorder

 

(F40–F48)

Neurotic, stress-related and somatoform disorders

 

(F40) Phobic anxiety disorders

(F40.0) Agoraphobia

(F40.1) Social phobias

Anthropophobia

Social neurosis

(F40.2) Specific (isolated) phobias

Acrophobia

Animal phobias

Claustrophobia

Simple phobia

(F40.8) Other phobic anxiety disorders

(F40.9) Phobic anxiety disorder, unspecified

Phobia NOS

Phobic state NOS

 

(F41) Other anxiety disorders

(F41.0) Panic disorder (episodic paroxysmal anxiety)

(F41.1) Generalized anxiety disorder

 

(F42) Obsessive-compulsive disorder

 

(F43) Reaction to severe stress, and adjustment disorders

(F43.0) Acute stress reaction

(F43.1) Post-traumatic stress disorder

(F43.2) Adjustment disorder

 

(F44) Dissociative (conversion) disorders

(F44.0) Dissociative amnesia

(F44.1) Dissociative fugue

(F44.2) Dissociative stupor

(F44.3) Trance and possession disorders

(F44.4) Dissociative motor disorders

(F44.5) Dissociative convulsions

(F44.6) Dissociative anaesthesia and sensory loss

(F44.7) Mixed dissociative (conversion) disorders

(F44.8) Other dissociative (conversion) disorders

Ganser’s syndrome

Multiple personality

(F44.9) Dissociative (conversion) disorders, unspecified

 

(F45) Somatoform disorders

(F45.0) Somatization disorder

Briquet’s disorder

Multiple psychosomatic disorder

(F45.1) Undifferentiated somatoform disorder

(F45.2) Hypochondriacal disorder

Body dysmorphic disorder

Dysmorphophobia (nondelusional)

Hypochondriacal neurosis

Hypochondriasis

Nosophobia

(F45.3) Somatoform autonomic dysfunction

Cardiac neurosis

Da Costa’s syndrome

Gastric neurosis

Neurocirculatory asthenia

(F45.4) Persistent somatoform pain disorder

Psychalgia

(F45.8) Other somatoform disorders

(F45.9) Somatoform disorder, unspecified

 

(F48) Other neurotic disorders

(F48.0) Neurasthenia

(F48.1) Depersonalization-derealization syndrome

(F48.8) Other specified neurotic disorders

Dhat syndrome

Occupational neurosis, including writer’s cramp

Psychasthenia

Psychasthenic neurosis

Psychogenic syncope

(F48.9) Neurotic disorder, unspecified

Neurosis NOS

 

(F50–F59)

Behavioral syndromes associated with

physiological disturbances and

physical factors

 

(F50) Eating disorders

(F50.0) Anorexia nervosa

(F50.1) Atypical anorexia nervosa

(F50.2) Bulimia nervosa

(F50.3) Atypical bulimia nervosa

(F50.4) Overeating associated with other psychological disturbances

(F50.5) Vomiting associated with other psychological disturbances

(F50.8) Other eating disorders

Pica in adults

(F50.9) Eating disorder, unspecified

 

(F51) Nonorganic sleep disorders

(F51.0) Nonorganic insomnia

(F51.1) Nonorganic hypersomnia

(F51.2) Nonorganic disorder of the sleep-wake schedule

(F51.3) Sleepwalking (somnambulism)

(F51.4) Sleep terrors (night terrors)

(F51.5) Nightmares

 

(F52) Sexual dysfunction, not caused by organic disorder or disease

(F52.0) Lack or loss of sexual desire

Frigidity

Hypoactive sexual desire disorder

(F52.1) Sexual aversion and lack of sexual enjoyment

Anhedonia (sexual)

(F52.2) Failure of genital response

Female sexual arousal disorder

Male erectile disorder

Psychogenic impotence

(F52.3) Orgasmic dysfunction

Inhibited orgasm (male)(female)

Psychogenic anorgasmy

(F52.4) Premature ejaculation

(F52.5) Nonorganic vaginismus

(F52.6) Nonorganic dyspareunia

(F52.7) Excessive sexual drive

(F52.8) Other sexual dysfunction, not caused by organic disorder or disease

(F52.9) Unspecified sexual dysfunction, not caused by organic disorder or disease

 

(F53) Mental and behavioural disorders associated with the puerperium, not elsewhere classified

(F53.0) Mild mental and behavioural disorders associated with the puerperium, not elsewhere classified

Postnatal depression NOS

Postpartum depression NOS

(F53.1) Severe mental and behavioural disorders associated with the puerperium, not elsewhere classified

Puerperal psychosis NOS

 

(F54) Psychological and behavioural factors associated with disorders or diseases classified elsewhere

 

(F55) Abuse of non-dependence-producing substances

 

(F59) Unspecified behavioral syndromes associated with physiological disturbances and physical factors

 

(F60–F69)

Disorders of adult personality and behavior

 

(F60) Specific personality disorders

(F60.0) Paranoid personality disorder

(F60.1) Schizoid personality disorder

(F60.2) Dissocial personality disorder

Antisocial personality disorder

(F60.3) Emotionally unstable personality disorder

Borderline personality disorder

(F60.4) Histrionic personality disorder

(F60.5) Anankastic personality disorder

Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder

(F60.6) Anxious (avoidant) personality disorder

(F60.7) Dependent personality disorder

(F60.8) Other specific personality disorders

Eccentric personality disorder

Haltlose personality disorder

Immature personality disorder

Narcissistic personality disorder

Passive-aggressive personality disorder

Psychoneurotic personality disorder

(F60.9) Personality disorder not otherwise specified

Personality disorder unspecified

 

(F61) Mixed and other personality disorders

 

(F62) Enduring personality changes, not attributable to brain damage and disease

 

(F63) Habit and impulse disorders

(F63.0) Pathological gambling

(F63.1) Pathological fire-setting (pyromania)

(F63.2) Pathological stealing (kleptomania)

(F63.3) Trichotillomania

(F63.8) Other habit and impulse disorders

Intermittent Explosive Disorder

 

(F64) Gender identity disorders

(F64.0) Transsexualism

(F64.1) Dual-role transvestism

(F64.2) Gender identity disorder of childhood

 

(F65) Disorders of sexual preference

(F65.0) Sexual fetishism

(F65.1) Fetishistic transvestism

(F65.2) Exhibitionism

(F65.3) Voyeurism

(F65.4) Paedophilia

(F65.5) Sadomasochism

(F65.6) Multiple disorders of sexual preference

(F65.8) Other disorders of sexual preference

Frotteurism

Necrophilia

Zoophilia

 

(F66) Psychological and behavioural disorders associated with sexual development and orientation

(F66.0) Sexual maturation disorder

(F66.1) Ego-dystonic sexual orientation

(F66.2) Sexual relationship disorder

(F66.8) Other psychosexual development disorders

(F66.9) Psychosexual development disorder, unspecified

 

(F68) Other disorders of adult personality and behaviour

(F68.0) Elaboration of physical symptoms for psychological reasons

(F68.1) Intentional production or feigning of symptoms or disabilities, either physical or psychological (factitious disorder)

Munchausen syndrome

(F68.8) Other specified disorders of adult personality and behaviour

 

(F69) Unspecified disorder of adult personality and behaviour

 

(F70–F79)

Mental retardation

 

(F70) Mild mental retardation

 

(F71) Moderate mental retardation

 

(F72) Severe mental retardation

 

(F73) Profound mental retardation

 

(F78) Other mental retardation

 

(F79) Unspecified mental retardation

 

(F80–F89)

Disorders of psychological development

 

(F80) Specific developmental disorders of speech and language

(F80.0) Specific speech articulation disorder

(F80.1) Expressive language disorder

(F80.2) Receptive language disorder

Receptive aphasia

(F80.3) Acquired aphasia with epilepsy (Landau-Kleffner)

(F80.8) Other developmental disorders of speech and language

Lisping

(F80.9) Developmental disorder of speech and language, unspecified

 

(F81) Specific developmental disorders of scholastic skills

(F81.0) Specific reading disorder

Developmental dyslexia

(F81.1) Specific spelling disorder

(F81.2) Specific disorder of arithmetical skills

Developmental acalculia

Gerstmann syndrome

(F81.3) Mixed disorder of scholastic skills

(F81.8) Other developmental disorders of scholastic skills

(F81.9) Developmental disorder of scholastic skills, unspecified

 

(F82) Specific developmental disorder of motor function

Developmental coordination disorder

 

(F83) Mixed specific developmental disorders

 

(F84) Pervasive developmental disorders

(F84.0) Childhood autism

(F84.1) Atypical autism

(F84.2) Rett’s syndrome

(F84.3) Other childhood disintegrative disorder

(F84.4) Overactive disorder associated with mental retardation and stereotyped movements

(F84.5) Asperger syndrome

 

(F88) Other disorders of psychological development

 

(F89) Unspecified disorder of psychological development

 

(F90–F98)

Behavioral and emotional disorders with

onset usually occurring

in childhood and adolescence

 

(F90) Hyperkinetic disorders

(F90.0) Disturbance of activity and attention

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

Attention deficit syndrome with hyperactivity

(F90.1) Hyperkinetic conduct disorder

(F90.8) Other hyperkinetic disorders

(F90.9) Hyperkinetic disorder, unspecified

 

(F91) Conduct disorders

(F91.0) Conduct disorder confined to the family context

(F91.1) Unsocialized conduct disorder

(F91.2) Socialized conduct disorder

(F91.3) Oppositional defiant disorder

(F91.8) Other conduct disorders

(F91.9) Conduct disorder, unspecified

 

(F92) Mixed disorders of conduct and emotions

(F92.0) Depressive conduct disorder

(F92.8) Other mixed disorders of conduct and emotions

(F92.9) Mixed disorder of conduct and emotions, unspecified

 

(F93) Emotional disorders with onset specific to childhood

(F93.0) Separation anxiety disorder of childhood

(F93.1) Phobic anxiety disorder of childhood

(F93.2) Social anxiety disorder of childhood

(F93.3) Sibling rivalry disorder

(F93.8) Other childhood emotional disorders

Identity disorder

Overanxious disorder

(F93.9) Childhood emotional disorder, unspecified

 

(F94) Disorders of social functioning with onset specific to childhood and adolescence

(F94.0) Elective mutism

(F94.1) Reactive attachment disorder of childhood

(F94.2) Disinhibited attachment disorder of childhood

(F94.8) Other childhood disorders of social functioning

(F94.9) Childhood disorder of social functioning, unspecified

 

(F95) Tic disorders

(F95.0) Transient tic disorder

(F95.1) Chronic motor or vocal tic disorder

(F95.2) Combined vocal and multiple motor tic disorder (Gilles de la Tourette)

(F95.8) Other tic disorders

(F95.9) Tic disorder, unspecified

 

(F98) Other behavioral and emotional disorders with onset usually occurring in childhood and adolescence

(F98.0) Nonorganic enuresis

(F98.1) Nonorganic encopresis

(F98.2) Feeding disorder of infancy and childhood

(F98.3) Pica of infancy and childhood

(F98.4) Stereotyped movement disorders

(F98.5) Stuttering (stammering)

(F98.6) Cluttering

(F98.8) Other specified behavioural and emotional disorders with onset usually occurring in childhood and adolescence

Attention deficit disorder without hyperactivity

Excessive masturbation

Nail-biting

Nose-picking

Thumb-sucking

 

(F98.9) Unspecified behavioral and emotional disorders with onset usually occurring in childhood and adolescence

 

(F99)

Unspecified mental disorder

(F99) Mental disorder, not otherwise specified

Sursa: Wikipedia